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The do’s and don’ts of an immigration interview

Receiving a notice from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) that you will need to go through an immigration interview is stressful and worrisome. You likely will start wondering what it is you’ve done wrong to result in an interview or if you filed the wrong paperwork to be in the country. Either way, let’s take a look at the do’s and don’ts of the immigration interview.

Below is a list of what you should do in preparation for and during an immigration interview:

  • Bring plenty of copies of your documents and forms
  • If you are married to a United States citizen, you should prepare yourself to answer personal questions
  • Follow all instructions given by the USCIS officer conducting the interview
  • Only answer questions that are directed at you in the interview
  • If you do not understand or speak English, you should bring an interpreter
  • Dress for success. Dress as if you are going to work in an office setting
  • Arrive early for the interview so you are not walking in late

Below is a list of what you should never do during an immigration interview:

  • Never joke with the USCIS officer. This is a serious matter
  • Never argue with your spouse or another family member with you in the interview
  • Never argue with the USCIS officer
  • Never refuse to answer any of the questions posed to you
  • Never lie to the USCIS officer

If you have to take part in an immigration interview, it’s important that you handle the situation as appropriately as possible. You don’t want to make inappropriate statements or jokes that could lead to a deeper investigation as to why you are in the country.

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